The Fundamentals of Fight Focused Handgun Part One

By Roger Phillips, Owner and Operator of Fight Focused Concepts

This is going to be a multiple part article that takes an in-depth look at the fundamentals of the art of fighting with your handgun.

We all know that the fundamentals of marksmanship (FOM) are very important, but they are not the “end all be all” that some would lead you to believe. While I teach the FOM, I teach them within their correct context, meaning I let you know the how, where, when, and why and the common sense behind these factors. I also teach much more in regards to the context of the fundamentals of fight focused handgun (FOFFH.) The FOM are relatively easy to teach and learn, but the FOFFH are much more involved, much more in-depth, and allow us to cover the reality of the fight in a much more efficient manner, due to how well-rounded the methodology is. The FOFFH leave us in the position to be extremely versatile, with the ability to improvise and adapt to the very wide spectrum of the reality of the fight. I call this wide spectrum of possibilities “The Fight Continuum.”

The reality of the fight is determined by the vast number of situations that you can possibly run into. Since the bad guys are the ones that initiate the fight, “the fight will be what the fight will be.” It is our job to take what has shown up on our door step and turn it into something that allows us to take back the lost initiative and turn the fight into the fight that we want it to be. This is of paramount of importance to the FOFFH! As good guys we do not dictate the way the fight starts, all we can do is take what is given to us and turn it into something that is as advantageous as we can possibly make it. When we look at all of the ways that we can be attack, it is very clear that the FOM are only a small part of the knowledge and skills that we need to have.

“Situations dictate strategies, strategies dictate tactics, and tactics dictate techniques.”

Techniques are nothing more than a very wide range of fluid concepts, that you have ingrained in through your training, that allow you to plug them into the specifics of the situation that has presented itself to you.

Versatility such as this is not simple, it requires knowledge, training, reflection, and repetition. But on the flip side of the coin, it is not complicated. When you study the reality of the fight, this versatility is as fundamental as it can possibly be. For a recent example of how fundamental this is, all you have to do is look at the Mixed Martial Arts of Ultimate Fighting. The only way you can compete is to be well-rounded, versatile, and have an answer for whatever your adversary brings to you. Believing that all you will ever need is awareness, mindset, and the FOM is nothing more than wishful thinking.

With that said, let’s get started.

The Stable Fighting Platform

Newbie’s like to talk about “stance,” but that is usually coming from the world of target shooting. Advanced students of fighting prefer to deal in terms such as stable fighting platform (SFP.) The advanced students understand that a “stance” is nothing more than a starting point from which their SFP starts. For the SFP we are looking for something athletic, (because fighting is an athletic endeavor) something that facilitates good balance, something that gives you good stability, and something that allows for and facilitates quality movement options. Balance is usually about how wide (side to side) your stationery foot placement is. I find that my best stationery balance is when my foot placement is just to the outside of my shoulders. My movement based balance comes from the study and training of quality athletic/fighting foot work. The very foundation of quality movement based balance comes down to the lowering of the base, by the bending of the knees, which lowers the center of gravity. This type of lowering of the based is also very beneficial inside of number of aspects of movement, well beyond just balance.

Stability is all about creating a robust platform that helps control recoil, helps deal with your adversaries forward drive, and helps keeps your gun lock in on the targeted area while moving. Stationary stability comes from one foot being positioned forward and one foot being positioned rearward, much like a typical boxers stance. This is also very good for movement since it is an athletic position. It is also very helpful to have an aggressive forward lean. Standing with your feet on or near the same horizontal line, standing straight up and down, or leaning back leads to very poor stability. Stability starts from the ground, but it continues up through the entire body, and out to the very grip on the handgun. This stability has a lot of influence on your recoil control and you ability for fast and accurate follow-up shots. During movement , whether controlled of dynamic, having the ability to stabilize the handguns index on the targeted area requires a perfect balance of tension and relaxation, dependent on the situation and the necessary speed of you movement.

Good athletic balance and stability, positively and directly affects your ability to facilitate quality movement. Whether you are using controlled movement, so you can get your sights or dynamic movement with your point shooting skills, having good balance and stability puts you in the best possible position to get off of the line of attack.

When extreme precision is needed, skeletal support is always better that muscular support. Straighten out the legs to take the muscles out of play and rely of the straight bones to give you the most stable fighting platform that the situation will allow. If possible, use braced positional shooting to further stabilize your fighting platform.

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