The Fundamentals of Fight Focused Handgun Part Three

By Roger Phillips, Owner and Operator of Fight Focused Concepts

The Grip

The grip is one of the most important of the fundamentals!

Without a good grip, all else suffers.

In the beginning of my training progression, I took around forty-five Modern Techniques courses and the “Weaver” is the way that I was originally taught to shoot. While there is nothing really wrong with the Weaver, it is not the way that I prefer to shoot now. As I grew in skill and knowledge, my focus changed to being fight focused. This change in focus lead me to understand the extreme importance of one-handed shooting and I found that the one-handed methodology of the Modern Techniques was not up to par with some of the combat proven methodologies of the past. As I looked at the work of Fairbairn, Sykes, and Applegate I began to see that the two-handed Modern Isosceles was much more in line with the reality based aspects of fighting with your handgun.

When it comes to my two-handed grip, I basically use what is used by most of the top competitors and operators in the world, the thumbs forward grip of the Modern Isosceles.

The Master Grip (please make sure your pistol is unloaded)

The master grip is your starting point, it is the grip of the firing side hand. It remains the same no matter what else inside of your grip needs to be adjusted to the situation. It allows for fast and accurate shooting with a full two-handed grip, a modified two-handed grip, and the one-handed grip. This is all about getting high on the handgun for recoil control, proper cycling of the slide, and aligned with the forearm to give skeletal structure behind the handgun. The web of the hand is as high up on the back strap and under the tang as possible. The middle finger as up as high as possible under the trigger guard. The thumb and the trigger finger are both pointed forward as if the handgun was nothing more than an extension of your pointed finger or thumb. The grip pressure is that of a man shaking another man’s hand.

All of these things add up to a high and firm grip, with plenty of structure behind the handgun, that will allow the handguns slide to cycle as designed, and for there to be a good level of recoil control. This is a great foundation for one-handed and two-handed shooting. If you are going to use one-handed shooting you may want to supplement your grip by tightening your grip and adding tension to the full length of your arm.

The Support Hand Grip

The support hand grip is all about achieving as much purchase on the handgun as possible. From your master grip examine the portion of the frame that is still exposed around your master grip. The concept is that of using your support side hand as a jigsaw puzzle piece to fill in the exposed portion of the frame of the gun. Remember this is all about the amount of purchase on the handgun? If we just grab the handgun with our support side hand, you see that there is still a good deal of frame exposed. The only way to get as full of a purchase as possible is to cam the support side hand, with the thumb moving significantly forward, along the frame and under the slide. When viewed from the top of the gun, the support side thumb should be extended forward near the same length as your straight trigger finger. The support side index finger should be as high as possible under the trigger guard. This is the thumbs forward grip and is very different from the high thumbs grip of the Modern Techniques or the thumbs locked down of the revolver shooters.

The strength of the support side grip is once again….”how a man shakes another man’s hand.”

The isometric tension is not the “push/pull” of the Modern Techniques (like placing the front strap and the back strap in a vise.) The isometric tension is in the full purchase of the firm grip, with nearly equal pressure on all four sides of the frame of the handgun. Along with the full purchase the support side hand in it’s cam like positioning, it is applying rearward cam like pressure to the lower portion of the front strap. The ring finger and the pinky (especially the pinky) are very important in recoil control and fast and accurate follow up shots. This cam like pressure at the lower front of the grip, combined with a the firing side web of the hand high under the tang, leads to the very best recoil control as possible. The recoil does not just snap the upper rear portion of the handgun rearward, it snaps the lower front portion of the grip forward, The cam like pressure of the support side hand mitigates the lower portion of the grip from snapping forward.

Both arms should be nearly straight with a decent level of tension. The cam like pressure may leave the support side arm actually higher than the firing side arm. Round it out with a stable fighting platform and with a good fighting structure and we are ready to move on to the draw stoke.

Questions are more than welcome.

“Question everyone and everything!”

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