The Fundamentals of Fight Focused Handgun Part Two

By Roger Phillips, Owner and Operator of Fight Focused Concepts

The Fighting Structure

In the last article, we discussed the stable fighting platform. If you noticed, I did not go into The Weaver, The Isosceles, The Modern Isosceles, or the Fairbairn and Sykes Combat Crouch. The reason for this is because each of these methodologies have their place inside of the reality of the fight. I am not here to tell you that what I advocate is the only way to do something, there are many ways to skin a cat and I am just discussing the things that I prefer and why I prefer them.

As we work up the body, from the fighting platform, we need to look at the fighting structure before we begin to discuss the grip.

Inside of most self-defense applications of the handgun, there are very specific reality’s that effect our physiological responses. These responses are dictated by your position inside of the reactionary curve. You are either going to be ahead in the reactionary curve, at equal initiative, behind in the reactionary curve, or way behind in the reactionary curve. This reality on whether we are proactive or reactive is paramount. There is no more important factor than this one issue! This is the genesis from which all of our responses originate from! It leads us to something that I call “the balance to hit and to not be hit.” This balance is huge when we discuss our platform, structure, and grip. The level and direction of the pressure that you are dealing with effects your physiological response, your necessary retention considerations, and your corresponding structure.

“Nobody wants to be 6’4″ when bullets are incoming.”

This is a reality that most of the target shooting based methodologies do not consider. The physiological desire to make yourself smaller when there is incoming fire is well documented. The bending of the knees mentioned in the last article is only one method of making yourself smaller. Another method is the dropping of the head and the hunching of the shoulders in order to protect the head. This is commonly called “turtling” inside of the Modern Isosceles circles. While some people believe that this is not the most appropriate way to shoot a handgun, it does make a lot of sense when we talk about the reality of the fight and the corresponding physiological effects of not wanting to be shot.

The fight focused world is a 360 degree world and we need to have the ability to fight in every direction on the clock, while moving (controlled or dynamically) to any direction on the clock. Planting yourself in the kill zone, on the line of attack, and using a default, high pectoral, linear, two-handed draw stroke may not even be close to the best answer to the problem, especially when behind in the reactionary curve. Our fighting structure needs to be a fluid structure that allows us to be as deadly as we can possible be, all while keeping us as safe as possible. One handed skill are just as important as two-handed skills. It is your hands and your grip that limits your movement. When we are looking to dodge the adversaries attack/aim we cannot have our movement limited in any manner.

The amount that the situation allows us to project the handgun towards the adversary is something that is often missed by the pistol-vs-pistol crowd, that does not train for attacks by edged or blunt weapons. The retention concept is a fight focused concept that understands that it not always pistol-vs-pistol and that projecting a handgun toward an edged or blunt weapon attack is a fools mistake. The fluid structure of the retention concepts allows us to make the hits at whatever retention level is needed to keep us as safe as possible. This fluid retention level requires us to make changes to our structure in order to recover from recoil in the most efficient manner possible and have enough structure behind the handgun so that it functions correctly. Full extension has skeletal structure behind the gun (long straight bones) but the more we break down the skeletal support, inside of the retention concept, the more we have to bring muscular support to the fore front. A tight grip is not enough to insure good recoil control and the proper function of your handgun. This requires building a structure behind your handgun that starts from your feet, continues up through the body, and down the arms. The stable fighting platform, the aggressive forward lean, the turtling, that ability to fight in every direction on the clock, the use of the skeletal structure, the necessary tension of the muscular structure inside of the retention concept, and your grip all add up to your fighting structure.

Next article will be on the specifics of the grip.

Questions are more than welcome!

“Question everyone…..question everything!”

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