The Sequence of Shooting

By Roger Phillips, Owner and Operator of Fight Focused Concepts
 I have lectured and demonstrated this concept hundreds of times, knowing perfectly well that I may have missed something. I finally decided to get it written out so it can be put into a handout inside of my courses.

 

(Mental Prep, Brain Leads Body Follows)

  • Eye hand coordination draw stroke
  • Lock in on the focal point
  • Perfect body mechanics

(Perfect Count One)

  • Clear the cover garment
  • Acquire perfect master grip
  • Stage support side hand for the thumbs forward camming grip
  • Begin to bring focus off of the identified threat and back to where the front sight is going to land, focal transition

(Perfect Count Two)

  • Elbow up to high pectoral
  • Elbow down to parallel to the ground
  • Finger goes to the trigger and slack is removed
  • Focal transition still in progress
  • Begin to drive gun in a straight line to the point of aim

(Perfect Count Three)

  • Hands come together in the staged thumbs forward camming grip
  • Pressure is beginning to be added to the trigger
  • Focal transition is being completed

(Perfect Count Four)

  • Perfect balance of speed and control
  • Drive the gun out to a perfectly locked in thumbs forward camming grip
  • Trigger is stage to break off the shot
  • Press out to extension with zero disruption
  • Hard focus on a perfect sight alignment on a perfect sight picture achieved by the focal transition

(Engage)

  • Press off the shot
  • Follow the front sight during recoil
  • Verify recoil recovery with post landing back in the notch
  • Trigger reset
  • Asses the threat through the sights
  • Press off subsequent shots as needed, verifying recoil recovery, and the post landing back in the notch

2 thoughts on “The Sequence of Shooting

  1. Roger is this not pretty much the same draw stroke used with point shooting where your target of choose is the chest or head? The difference being the focus of your eyes, be it target with gun/sights blurred or sights with target out of focus.

    1. Yes Bill, the draw stroke does not change whether you can get to your sights or whether you can not get to your sights. The only difference between the sighted fire draw stroke and the point shooting draw stroke is the focal transition.

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